Lancashire At War.co.uk

Exploring the hidden history of War sites in Lancashire

Walney Island ROC Bunker

On Walney Island near Barrow, next to the only surviving structure from Fort Walney is an ROC Bunker - Royal Observer Corps Monitoring Posts. These Cold War relics are reminders of a time when a nuclear attack seemed like a real possibility. Three men would have lived six feet underground in a small room and recorded what was going on above ground in the event of a nuclear strike. They would also regularly go down there and monitor and record as part of the ROC's role. According to Subterranea Britannica "the metal dome and bracket on the ventilation shaft indicates this was a master post".

SAM_5554 (480x640) SAM_5553 (480x640) WP_20160710_14_47_08_Pro (640x360) SAM_5551 (640x480) SAM_5556 (640x480) WP_20160710_14_39_16_Pro (360x640) SAM_5560 (480x640) SAM_5557 (640x480)

We were very lucky to be shown the ROC bunker by the new owners of the former coastguard building (previously the Battery Observation Post from Fort Walney).

 

Jo Sweeney was the only one of us brave enough to go down into the dark - and she very kindly gave us permission to use her two photos of the interior. (RIGHT)

 

You can see more photos of the area on her blogsite HERE

 

The ROC post seems to be in pretty good condition and thankfully has not been filled with water for the golf course as someone speculated on http://www.subbrit.org.uk

 

One local remembers that there were bunkbeds down there when he ventured inside some years ago. Sadly they are now gone.

 

The new owners want to preserve the bunker and we would like to remind all readers that it is on private property and is not usually accessible.

 

Walney ROC Jo Sweeney1 Walney ROC Jo Sweeney2

RIGHT: A trench has been dug from the ventilation shaft to the hardstanding. It is uncertain what this is for - unless perhaps there was once a drainage issue?

 

 

 

 

 

LEFT: The view of the ROC post from the top of the Battery Observation Tower - where the ROC were probably stationed during the Second World War - one sight next to another from another war.

 

RIGHT: The remains of the perimeter fence.